‘Unfinished work and damaged materials’: historians and the Scots in the Commonwealth of Poland–Lithuania (1569–1795)

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Abstract

The burgeoning of a historiography of the Scots in Poland–Lithuania has been
hindered by either the unavailability to scholars of, or their unwillingness to
tackle, secondary sources in the relevant foreign languages. Despite this ethnic group having comprised, at one time, the largest representation of the Scottish diaspora in a foreign state, this article demonstrates that, since Poland–Lithuania’s partition, historiographical coverage has been compartmentalised along linguistic and national lines. The article is tripartite, outlining work in the German, Polish and English languages, albeit highlighting the detrimental effects caused, until recently, by the frequent isolation of these, and other linguistic traditions of historiographical significance, from one another.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-21
Number of pages21
JournalImmigrants and Minorities
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Sep 2015

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historian
linguistics
German language
diaspora
historiography
foreign language
English language
social isolation
ethnic group
coverage
time

Keywords

  • Historiography
  • Scotland
  • Poland
  • historians
  • diaspora
  • ethnicity

Cite this

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abstract = "The burgeoning of a historiography of the Scots in Poland–Lithuania has beenhindered by either the unavailability to scholars of, or their unwillingness totackle, secondary sources in the relevant foreign languages. Despite this ethnic group having comprised, at one time, the largest representation of the Scottish diaspora in a foreign state, this article demonstrates that, since Poland–Lithuania’s partition, historiographical coverage has been compartmentalised along linguistic and national lines. The article is tripartite, outlining work in the German, Polish and English languages, albeit highlighting the detrimental effects caused, until recently, by the frequent isolation of these, and other linguistic traditions of historiographical significance, from one another.",
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