THE CULTURE COLLECTION OF ALGAE AND PROTOZOA (CCAP): CURRENT EFFORTS AND VISION TO UNDERPIN THE RISE OF ALGAL AQUACULTURE

C. Rad-Menendez, J. G. Day, C. M. M. Gachon, C. N. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

In the last few years, algal cultivation has experienced a phenomenal level of development in Europe, and with it, the need for protocols to ensure the viability and functionality of the strains selected for farming has increased. In response the CCAP, as a Biological Resource Centre, is working on several strands of research to underpin the sustainability of the sector. In recent years, methodological development has increased the diversity of microalgal taxa that can be cryogenically stored successfully. Research has explored the functionality and stability of preserved materials, along with the implications of conserving algal-based consortia. In addition, collaborative capacity-building projects have resulted in new cryopreserved algal collections in Sweden, Belgium and Brazil. To support the development of disease management and biosecurity in micro- and macro-algal production facilities, protocols to isolate, maintain and cryopreserve pathogens of commercially important algae (e.g. Haematococcus, diatoms, red and brown seaweeds) have been developed. This effort is enabling considerable improvement in knowledge of the taxonomy, life cycle and physiology of these poorly- known pathogens and accordingly, supports the design of control methods to eradicate diseases in algal farms. As part of the GENIALG project, the CCAP is planning to establish an ambitious seaweed “seedbank” to ensure that wild genetic diversity is documented, conserved, and made publicly available for biotechnological and research purposes. A pan-European seedbank of the kelp Saccharina latissima will ensure not only the maintenance of a diverse number
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of strains, but also the preservation of their functionality, and where technically possible, genetic stability. Clonal gametophytes collected from defined geographic zones will be progressively accessed in the Collection, and efforts will be made to develop cryopreservation, guarantee strain stability and increase the robustness of maintenance protocols. Phenotyping and genotyping data will be gathered and made available to users worldwide via the CCAP
Knowledgebase.
Original languageEnglish
Article number325
Pages (from-to)154-155
Number of pages2
JournalPhycologia
Volume56
Issue number4(Supplement)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2017

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