Seasonal population dynamics of non-native Caprella mutica (Crustacea, Amphipoda) on the west coast of Scotland

Gail Ashton, Michael Burrows, Kate J Willis, Elizabeth Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Information on the life history and population dynamics of non-native species is essential to understand the process of invasion and impacts on invaded ecosystems. The non-native marine caprellid amphipod Caprella mutica has successfully established populations on coastlines throughout the temperate northern hemisphere and in New Zealand in the southern hemisphere. The introduction mechanism has been surpassed and it is now important to understand its ecology and biology in non-native habitats. The seasonal population dynamics of C. mutica were investigated over 18 months at four sites with different levels of anthropogenic disturbance on the west coast of Scotland. Abundance of C. mutica fluctuated seasonally at all sites, peaking during June to October. The highest abundance recorded on a single mesh collector was 319 000 individuals m(-2) in August 2004 at one of the fish farms. Both seasonal and site-specific factors influenced the population dynamics of C. mutica. Both males and females were significantly larger and more abundant at the fish farm sites. Individuals displayed reproductive characteristics at a smaller size at the fish farm sites, indicating earlier maturity. The results suggest that anthropogenic disturbance and artificial resource enhancement contribute to the global establishment success of non-native C. mutica.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)549-559
Number of pages11
JournalMarine and Freshwater Research
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • INVADER
  • Marine & Freshwater Biology
  • LIFE-HISTORY TRAITS
  • DISTURBANCE
  • Limnology
  • Oceanography
  • BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS
  • IMPACT
  • MARINE ECOSYSTEM
  • COMMUNITY
  • Fisheries
  • GROWTH
  • SALMON CAGES
  • SUCCESS

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