Poster: population ecology and juvenile density hotspots of thornback ray (Raja clavata) around the Shetland Islands, Scotland

Mia McAllister, Shaun Fraser, Lea-Anne Henry

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

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Abstract

Research into elasmobranch populations is needed to inform effective conservation and
management strategies given their vulnerability to threats such as habitat loss¹ and
fisheries overexploitation.² Population ecology studies are important for understanding
species distribution, dynamics, and may highlight important areas for the species such
as juvenile nursery grounds.
Identifying and protecting nursery areas is critical as they aid population recruitment.³
The thornback ray, Raja clavata, is a demersal elasmobranch occurring from 10-300m
on a variety of substrates.⁴ Key knowledge gaps identified by ICES and OSPAR include
locations of nurseries and other habitats where juvenile R. clavata are regularly found,
and population demographic data more generally.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2023
EventMASTS Annual Science Meeting 2023: “Science, Sustainability and Society – valuing and protecting our marine systems” -
Duration: 5 Dec 20237 Dec 2023

Conference

ConferenceMASTS Annual Science Meeting 2023
Period5/12/237/12/23

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