Photoacclimation to light-limitation in a clionaid sponge; implications for understanding sponge bioerosion on turbid reefs

Joseph Marlow, Simon Davy, Abdul Haris, James Bell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Watershed-based pollution is a common form of coral reef degradation. Affected reefs are often highly turbid, where light-limitation confines the distribution of photosynthetic benthic taxa and the capacity for photoacclimation is important for survival. We investigated low light photoacclimation in a Symbiodinium-hosting bioeroding sponge using in situ PAM fluorometry. Cliona aff. viridis was artificially shaded (70 & 95% ambient light reduction) on a low turbidity Indonesian reef for 25 days, with a subsequent 14-day recovery period. Significant changes in rETRmax, and qP, and a non-significant but observable decline in Ek, demonstrated that C. aff. viridis is able to photoacclimate to conditions of extreme light reduction and recover within a relatively short period of time. The sponge is therefore unlikely to be light limited on even the most turbid reefs. However, other aspects of watershed-pollution such as sedimentation may still limit their distribution in affected coastal waters.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)466-474
Number of pages9
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Volume135
Early online date24 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

Keywords

  • Turbidity
  • Photoacclimation
  • Bioeroding sponges
  • Chlorophyll flourometry

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