Parents' and Teenagers' Conceptions of Diet, Weight and Health: Does Class Matter? ESRC End of Award Research Report Ref: RES-000-23-1504

Wendy J. Wills, Kathryn Backett-Milburn, Julia Lawton, Donna MacKinnon, Mei-Li Roberts

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

The importance of young peoples’ health and particularly their eating habits has been highlighted in recent policy documents. These also place a continued emphasis on understanding factors contributing to socio-economic inequalities in health. Young people from lower social class families are at greater risk of becoming overweight/obese and of eating an ‘unhealthy’ diet.

Previous research by Wills and colleagues has explored diet, health and weight conceptualisations amongst families from lower social class groups with young teenagers with a range of BMIs. The current study will examine the dietary practices and health/weight conceptualisations of middle-class teenagers (aged 13-15 years), defined by their BMI as obese/overweight or non-obese/overweight. Qualitative, individual interviews will be undertaken with 36 young teenagers (18 boys and 18 girls). Interviews with parents/guardians will help situate these findings within the context of the family. To explore whether, and in what ways, class underpins perceptions and practices regarding diet, weight and health, the research will also involve a critical examination of key findings from the already completed research with lower social class families. This comparative work will inform policy and practice in the areas of diet, obesity and health inequalities.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationHatfield
PublisherUniversity of Hertfordshire
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Parents' and Teenagers' Conceptions of Diet, Weight and Health: Does Class Matter? ESRC End of Award Research Report Ref: RES-000-23-1504'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this