Making space for tourists with minority languages: the case of Belfast’s Gaeltacht Quarter

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This article examines the role of tourism as a motive and mechanism for change in contemporary cities, considering how the theming of space with tourists in mind necessarily involves other kinds of spatial and social transformation, and asking what role actual and hypothetical tourists play in local contests over space and representation. Looking closely at Belfast's Gaeltacht Quarter provides an insight into how global fashions in place marketing, tourism and minority language promotion intersect with the particularities of areas to which they are applied. This paper argues that the superficially value-neutral, internationally recognisable language of economic development can be used both as a means of transcending, and a means of strategically negotiating, intense struggles over space, identity and status.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventTravelling Languages: Culture, Communication and Translation in a Mobile World, 10th Annual Conference of the International Association of Languages and Intercultural Communication. - Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds, United Kingdom
Duration: 3 Dec 20105 Dec 2010

Conference

ConferenceTravelling Languages: Culture, Communication and Translation in a Mobile World, 10th Annual Conference of the International Association of Languages and Intercultural Communication.
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLeeds
Period3/12/105/12/10

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    Carden, S. (2010). Making space for tourists with minority languages: the case of Belfast’s Gaeltacht Quarter. Paper presented at Travelling Languages: Culture, Communication and Translation in a Mobile World, 10th Annual Conference of the International Association of Languages and Intercultural Communication. , Leeds, United Kingdom.