IN-SITU ACTIVITY OF THE SANDY BEACH BIVALVE DONAX-VITTATUS (BIVALVIA DONACIDAE) IN RELATION TO POTENTIAL PREDATION RISKS

Alan D Ansell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Underwater television with time lapse video recording was used to record in situ activity of the tellinacean bivalve Donax vittatus on West Sands Beach, St Andrews on the east coast of Scotland. Individuals emerged from the sand most frequently immediately before and after low water, when wave action in shallow water caused disturbance of the sediment. During this period, emergence was most frequently followed by 'leaping' and/or transport by wave-induced currents. Emergence or partial emergence during mid-tide periods was more frequently followed by surface or subsurface crawling. These activities resulted in a redistribution of the population which affected up to 44% of individuals during each tidal cycle. In all cases, reburial followed quickly. The number of emergence, 'leaping', and reburial events in each 30 min time interval showed a positive, and the number of crawling events a weak negative, correlation with the degree of disturbance by wave action. The separate inhalant and exhalant siphons, used to draw in the feeding cur-rent, remained extended and visible at the sand surface continuously except for periods when wave action was so strong as to stir the sand into suspension, causing intermittent withdrawal. The significance of these activities is discussed in relation to potential predation risks.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-53
Number of pages11
JournalETHOL ECOL EVOL
Volume6
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Keywords

  • Zoology
  • Behavioral Sciences

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