Holdfast fragmentation of Macrocystis pyrifera (integrifolia morph) and Lessonia berteroana in Atacama (Chile): a novel approach for kelp bed restoration

Renato Westermeier, Pedro Murúa, David J. Patiño, Liliana Muñoz, Dieter G. Müller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The kelps Macrocystis pyrifera (integrifolia morph) and Lessonia berteroana (northern lineage of Lessonia nigrescens) are intensely harvested in Atacama, northern Chile, for abalone forage and alginate production. Local situations call for simple restoration techniques for over-exploited kelp beds. We excised holdfast portions from parental specimens, including parts of stipes and phylloids. Untreated adult thalli and unmanipulated specimens served as controls. Fragments of both species were attached to boulders or rock platforms with elastic bands or cyanoacrylate glue. Transplanted fragments quickly formed new haptera, colonized new substrata, and reached reproductive maturity. Macrocystis regenerates increased in total length and holdfast diameter in one or both directions of the rhizome, forming a pair of stipes, followed by rhizome and haptera development. In Lessonia, tissue of non-injured zones took over new holdfast growth. Success of this propagation method varied with season and substrata. Both species proceeded to complete regeneration of holdfasts. However, holdfasts of older Macrocystis thalli partly decomposed, resulting in two apparently identical individuals. Advantages of these propagation methods are discussed in ecological and restoration contexts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2969-2977
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Phycology
Volume28
Issue number5
Early online date12 Mar 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016

Keywords

  • Chile
  • Holdfast fragments
  • Integrifolia morph
  • Kelp bed repopulation
  • Lessonia berteroana
  • Macrocystis
  • Phaeophyta

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Holdfast fragmentation of Macrocystis pyrifera (integrifolia morph) and Lessonia berteroana in Atacama (Chile): a novel approach for kelp bed restoration'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this