Growth dynamics of non-toxic Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima and toxic P. seriata (Bacillariophyceae) under simulated spring and summer photoperiods

Johanna Fehling, Keith Davidson, SS Bates

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Abstract

Marine planktonic diatoms of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia Peragallo have been responsible for amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP) events worldwide through the production of the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA). The appearance and toxicity of Pseudonitzschia species is variable throughout the year and potentially linked to changes in environmental parameters; many ASP events occur in relatively high latitudes where day length is particularly variable with season. In UK waters, shellfish monitoring has prevented any impact on human health but has led to long-term closures of fisheries, with severe economic consequences. Laboratory experiments on two Pseudo-nitzschia species typically found in Scottish West Coast waters during spring (short photoperiod (SP)) and summer (long photoperiod (LP)) conditions were conducted to determine the influence of photoperiod on their growth and toxicity. Results indicated that non-toxic P. delicatissima (Cleve) Heiden achieved a greater cell density under SP (9-h light: 15-h dark (L:D) cycle). For toxin-producing P. seriata (Cleve) H. Peragallo, a LP (18-h L:6-h D cycle) resulted in an enhanced growth rate, cell yield and total toxin production, but it decreased the toxin production per cell. A better understanding of the response of Pseudo-nitzschia species to photoperiod and other foreseeable environmental variables may help predict the appearance of toxic strains. (c) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)763-769
Number of pages7
JournalHarmful Algae
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Keywords

  • CARBON
  • MULTISERIES
  • MARINE-PHYTOPLANKTON
  • RATES
  • DIATOMS
  • Marine & Freshwater Biology
  • DARK CYCLES
  • REPRODUCTION
  • LIGHT
  • SHELLFISH
  • DOMOIC ACID

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