Enter the alien: foreign consorts and their royal entries into Scottish cities, c. 1449–1594

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

The arrival of a new queen to a realm was a momentous occasion full of expectations; often tied to treaties of peace, trade or military support, as well as offering the chance to secure the reigning dynasty through the production of a male heir. During the course of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, although becoming firmly established as a key player on the European stage, Scotland battled to keep up appearances with neighbouring European realms who had significantly more wealth and resources. The arrival and welcome of foreign queens and their entourages were occasions through which the Scottish monarchy was given the opportunity to impress their powerful allies. The preparations for the arrival of foreign queens, therefore, were often fraught with difficulties; particularly as the accompanying entourage would take word of the events in Scotland back to the European courts from whence they came. This chapter, developed from AHRC-funded doctoral research explores the arrivals, and subsequent entries, of royal consorts to Scotland through the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. The royal entries of foreign consorts into Edinburgh, and other Scottish cities, were opportunities for the people and the king to welcome the new queen and open channels of communications, as well as showcase Scotland’s cultural, intellectual and economic standing for a multi-cultural audience. By working back through Anne of Denmark (1594), Marie de Guise (1539), Margaret Tudor (1503), Margaret of Denmark (1469) and Mary of Guelders (1449), this chapter addresses how the monarchs and cities of Scotland welcomed these foreign queens to assess the continuity and change in the representations found within these ceremonial events.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCeremonial entries in early modern Europe
Subtitle of host publicationthe iconography of power
EditorsJ.R. Mulryne, Marie Ines Aliverti, Anna Maria Trastaverde
Place of PublicationFarnham
PublisherAshgate
Pages267-295
Number of pages29
ISBN (Electronic)9781315571140
ISBN (Print)9781472432032
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2015

Publication series

NameEuropean Festival Studies, 1450-1700
PublisherAshgate

Keywords

  • Ceremony
  • Medieval
  • Early modern
  • Festivals
  • Scotland
  • Queen
  • Royal entry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Enter the alien: foreign consorts and their royal entries into Scottish cities, c. 1449–1594'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Dean, L. H. S. (2015). Enter the alien: foreign consorts and their royal entries into Scottish cities, c. 1449–1594. In J. R. Mulryne, M. I. Aliverti, & A. M. Trastaverde (Eds.), Ceremonial entries in early modern Europe: the iconography of power (pp. 267-295). [13] (European Festival Studies, 1450-1700). Ashgate.