Delivering dignified care: A realist synthesis of evidence that promotes effective listening to and learning from older people's feedback in acute care settings

Megan Dickson, Helen Riddell, Fiona Gilmour, Brendan McCormack

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)
59 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To explore effective mechanisms for listening to and learning from feedback from older people in the context of acute care. Background: Maintaining the dignity of older people in acute care has become an issue of international concern. In the United Kingdom, recommendations for care improvement have led to the formation of an implementation group, the “Listening and Learning Hospitals Pilot Project.” This literature review forms phase 1 of the project. Design: Realist synthesis was used to explore and synthesise wide-ranging evidence. Methods: Using 12 databases, literature was scoped to propose four principles that underpin the context, mechanism and outcomes (CMO) of effective relation-based interventions with older people and their care partners in the acute care setting. A search was carried out in order to synthesise data to refute or support each principle. A total of 137 studies and 11 sources of grey literature were appraised and included. A final synthesis of evidence across all principles identified key mechanisms for effective relation-based interventions. Results: Eight essential mechanisms support effective care interventions. Conclusions: This review adds depth and breadth to current nursing knowledge in this field through the process of realist synthesis. Acute care organisations need to make a commitment to supporting relational care at organisation and unit levels. Additionally, they need to value and support the well-being of the nurses delivering it so that interventions to improve care for older people can succeed. Relevance to clinical practice: Essential mechanisms synthesised from the review, together with other suggested interventions for improving dignified care of older people in acute care by listening to them and learning from their feedback, may contribute towards practice development in acute care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4028-4038
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume26
Issue number23-24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Apr 2017

Keywords

  • acute care
  • assessment
  • communication
  • dignity
  • feedback
  • listening
  • older people
  • person-centred care
  • relationships

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