Biodegradation of crude oil across a wide range of salinities by an extremely halotolerant bacterial consortium MPD-M, immobilized onto polypropylene fibers

María Piedad Díaz, Kenneth G. Boyd, Steve J.W. Grigson, J. Grant Burgess

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

170 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The bacterial consortium MPD-M, isolated from sediment associated with Colombian mangrove roots, was effective in the treatment of hydrocarbons in water with salinities varying from 0 to 180 g L-1. Where the salinity of the culture medium surpassed 20 g L-1, its effectiveness increased when the cells were immobilized on polypropylene fibers. Over the range of salinity evaluated, the immobilized cells significantly enhanced the biodegradation rate of crude oil compared with free-living cells, especially with increasing salinity in the culture medium. Contrary to that observed in free cell systems, the bacterial consortium MPD-M was highly stable in immobilized systems and it was not greatly affected by increments in salinity. Biodegradation was evident even at the highest salinity evaluated (180 g L-1), where biodegradation was between 4 and 7 times higher with immobilized cells compared to free cells. The bio-degradation of pristane (PR) and phytane (PH) and of the aromatic fraction was also increased using cells immobilized on polypropylene fibers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-153
Number of pages9
JournalBiotechnology and Bioengineering
Volume79
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jul 2002

Keywords

  • Cell immobilization
  • Hydrocarbon biodegradation
  • Polypropylene fibers
  • Salinity

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