A live video observatory reveals temporal processes at a shelf-depth whale-fall

A G Glover, N D Higgs, P M Bagley, R Carlsson, A J Davies, K M Kemp, Kim Last, K Norling, R Rosenberg, K A Wallin, B Kallstrom, T G Dahlgren

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13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There have been very few studies of temporal processes at chemosynthetic ecosystems, even at relatively more accessible shallow water sites. Here we report the development and deployment of a simple cabled video observatory at 30 m water depth in Gullmarsfjorden, Sweden. The camera provides a live video feed to the internet of faunal activity in the experiments, which to date have included 5 separate whale-fall deployments. Our data suggest that the time to decomposition of small cetacean carcasses at shelf-depth settings is considerably slower than at deep-sea sites. We have also provided a new methodology for the deployment of low-cost live video observatories at up to 30 m water depth, which can be used both for research and outreach activities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-381
Number of pages7
JournalCAH BIOL MAR
Volume51
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • DEEP-SEA
  • FAUNA
  • Marine & Freshwater Biology
  • CONSUMPTION
  • WORMS
  • REMAINS
  • NORTH-ATLANTIC

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    Glover, A. G., Higgs, N. D., Bagley, P. M., Carlsson, R., Davies, A. J., Kemp, K. M., Last, K., Norling, K., Rosenberg, R., Wallin, K. A., Kallstrom, B., & Dahlgren, T. G. (2010). A live video observatory reveals temporal processes at a shelf-depth whale-fall. CAH BIOL MAR, 51(4), 375-381.